sydney-leathers

Maggie // 22 // New Jersey
femburton:

well i waited a whole day and no one gifed my favorite part so here

femburton:

well i waited a whole day and no one gifed my favorite part so here

(via officiousseeing-eyebitch)

shoulderblades:

backstage at oumou sy, dakar fashion week, 2001
sample: 100 fashion designers - 010 curators

shoulderblades:

backstage at oumou sy, dakar fashion week, 2001

sample: 100 fashion designers - 010 curators

(via cumomelet)

fashionsfromhistory:

"1762 Doll" from the Gratitude Train

Edward Molyneux

1949

Molyneux’s contribution features janseniste panniers, and was inspired by a portrait of Madame de Pompadour by de la Tour. Janseniste panniers were shorter and lighter-weight, stiffened with horsehair or boning and popular in the second half of the 18th-century. They were similar to English pocket panniers and allowed the wearer to access pockets in undergarments. Maurice Quentin de La Tour (1704-1788) was the French portrait artist to King Louis XV of France from 1750 to 1773. During his tenure, one of his many subjects was that of Madame de Pompadour (1721-1764), the famous courtesan and official mistress of Louis XV. “Madame Pompadour” (1755) depicts her in her home surrounded by books and works of art, alluding to her desire to enlighten the French court with the intellectual developments of Parisian culture at the time.

MET

(via fashionsfromhistory)

cybergata:

Elephants walking through a rain forest.

cybergata:

Elephants walking through a rain forest.

(via mirabile---visu)

(Source: fenneri, via drinkingsomewine)

(Source: dizorubu, via charlottefree)

(Source: nwnuwu, via drugloser)

mostlycatsmostly:

necoto friends (by necoto.)

mostlycatsmostly:

necoto friends (by necoto.)

(via derpycats)

people in high school used to call me “succulent tendril” due to my habit of sprouting rather succulent tendrils from my body that classmates could pick and consume, to their endless delight

(Source: jesuschristofborg, via bonerfart)

magictransistor:

John Gutmann. The Game New Orleans, Lunch Hour San Francisco, Mission Car, The Warriors Harlem, The Artist Lives Dangerously, Shoshoni Indians Wyoming, Strange Visitors, Street Performers New Orleans, Death Stalks The Fillmore, Man in the Straw Hat (top to bottom). 1930s.

"

Why is it that people are willing to spend $20 on a bowl of pasta with sauce that they might actually be able to replicate pretty faithfully at home, yet they balk at the notion of a white-table cloth Thai restaurant, or a tacos that cost more than $3 each? Even in a city as “cosmopolitan” as New York, restaurant openings like Tamarind Tribeca (Indian) and Lotus of Siam (Thai) always seem to elicit this knee-jerk reaction from some diners who have decided that certain countries produce food that belongs in the “cheap eats” category—and it’s not allowed out. (Side note: How often do magazine lists of “cheap eats” double as rundowns of outer-borough ethnic foods?)

Yelp, Chowhound, and other restaurant sites are littered with comments like, “$5 for dumplings?? I’ll go to Flushing, thanks!” or “When I was backpacking in India this dish cost like five cents, only an idiot would pay that much!” Yet you never see complaints about the prices at Western restaurants framed in these terms, because it’s ingrained in people’s heads that these foods are somehow “worth” more. If we’re talking foie gras or chateaubriand, fair enough. But be real: You know damn well that rigatoni sorrentino is no more expensive to produce than a plate of duck laab, so to decry a pricey version as a ripoff is disingenuous. This question of perceived value is becoming increasingly troublesome as more non-native (read: white) chefs take on “ethnic” cuisines, and suddenly it’s okay to charge $14 for shu mai because hey, the chef is ELEVATING the cuisine.

"

-

One of the entries from the list ‘20 Things Everyone Thinks About the Food World (But Nobody Will Say)’. (via crankyskirt)

GO THE FUCK OFFFF

(via thagal)

(via cumomelet)

(Source: y6s, via inpatientcare)